AUTODESK STUDENT EXPERT

Skills: 3D Modeling (Fusion 360), Teaching, Project Management

During my time at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, I became super excited about the maker movement, particularly the power of 3D modeling and printing. As a sophomore, I started working as a teaching assistant for GE 101: Engineering Graphics and Design, where I helped General, Industrial, and Civil Engineering students learn the basic principles of 3D modeling through Inventor and Revit exercises. I also began working on my own 3D modeling projects, including a functioning 3D printed hand (check out Enabling the Future for more details), recycled 3D printed jewelry, and prototypes for many of my product design projects.

In my junior year, I was able to get involved with research into generative design and high precision 3D printing on Autodesk's first 3D printer, the Ember. I also started to get involved with Autodesk's Student Expert program, which has given me opportunities to teach people about Autodesk's suite of 3D software programs (free for non-professional level users!), especially Fusion 360,  learn more about the products and projects Autodesk is working on, and work with other students and professionals excited about 3D design. 

One such opportunity was Design for Autodesk, a program through Autodesk's Design Academy that offered students a $350 reward to model multi-part products using Fusion360.  The objective of the program was to get more students to use Fusion 360 while also helping improve the software by getting feedback on the tool's usability and design. For my first project, I modeled a motor of some sort of motor (the plans were in Spanish so I'm not exactly sure) given to me by Autodesk. My final renderings and an animation of the final product can be found below.

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This summer, I had the chance to attend the Student Expert Bootcamp at Autodesk's offices in the Boston Design Center, where I learned about some of the more advanced and upcoming features of Fusion 360 from current Autodesk employees and competed in a 24 hour 3D design competition against other Student Experts from across the US. Our final rendering for that project, which entailed incorporating premade drone pieces to into a unique remote controlled toy, device, or product for "Steve" a 43 year old middle class dad yearning for some more excitement in his life, can be found below. 

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